ANTHONY DE MELLO PIEW PTAKA PDF

This is the sixth Pray as you go reflection, commemorating the two hundredth anniversary of the Restoration of the Society of Jesus. A reflection on the life of Anthony de Mello. Anthony de Mello was born in in Bombay, and had a major influence on Christian spirituality across the globe. In his writings and conferences he used examples and stories from the major faith traditions, especially drawing on the insights and truths found in both Hinduism and Buddhism. Anthony de Mello died in The explorer returned to his people, who were anxious to know about the Amazon.

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This is the sixth Pray as you go reflection, commemorating the two hundredth anniversary of the Restoration of the Society of Jesus. A reflection on the life of Anthony de Mello. Anthony de Mello was born in in Bombay, and had a major influence on Christian spirituality across the globe.

In his writings and conferences he used examples and stories from the major faith traditions, especially drawing on the insights and truths found in both Hinduism and Buddhism. Anthony de Mello died in The explorer returned to his people, who were anxious to know about the Amazon.

But how could he ever put into words the feelings that flooded his heart when he saw exotic flowers and heard the night-sounds of the forests; when he sensed the danger of wild beasts or paddled his canoe over treacherous rapids? They pounced upon the map. They framed it in their Town Hall. They made copies of it for themselves. And all who had a copy considered themselves experts on the river, for did they not know its every turn and bend, how broad it was, how deep, where the rapids were and where the falls?

He used them, as Jesus used his parables, to prompt people to think for themselves. In your own life, what corresponds to the map the explorer draws?

What, on the other hand, corresponds to his experience of the Amazon? How do you encounter God in your prayer? Do you find God difficult to encounter. Spend a few moments reflecting on this.

As you listen to the reading again, ask yourself how you would respond to those people who wanted to know about the Amazon. No more words! Take a moment simply to feel the God who is greater even than the mighty Amazon river flood your own heart. This is the seventh reflection commemorating the two hundredth anniversary of the Restoration of the Society of Jesus. A reflection on the life of Gerard Manley Hopkins.

Wherever it is I am right now, what works of the Lord can I see? Perhaps the sky, the clouds? Perhaps hills or fields, or a horse or a dog, or a tree?

Perhaps another human being. Can I imagine all these things, the works of the Lord, praising God, their creator, now? And can I do the same myself? Gerard Manley Hopkins was born in was an English poet and convert from Anglicanism.

He developed a love of the arts as a young boy, and continued to write and paint all of his life. When he chose to become a Catholic and then enter the Jesuits he destroyed most of his early poetic works, and for his early years as a Jesuit he stopped writing. His use of language was innovative, employing ancient as well as dialect words, and even inventing new words.

He ministered quietly in various schools and parishes in Britain before being sent as Professor of Greek and Hebrew at the newly-established Catholic University in Dublin. Few of Hopkins contemporaries appreciated his poetic gifts and it was only after his death in when his friend, Robert Bridges, the Poet Laureate, published a volume of Hopkins work that his genius began to be recognised. He has a plaque in Poets Corner in Westminster Abbey.

The world is charged with the grandeur of God. It will flame out, like shining from shook foil; It gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil Crushed. Why do men then now not reck his rod? Generations have trod, have trod, have trod; And all is seared with trade; bleared, smeared with toil; And wears man's smudge and shares man's smell: the soil Is bare now, nor can foot feel, being shod.

And for all this, nature is never spent; There lives the dearest freshness deep down things; And though the last lights off the black West went Oh, morning, at the brown brink eastward, springs — Because the Holy Ghost over the bent World broods with warm breast and with ah!

Can you think of a time when you have felt especially close to God in a natural setting? Does this ring true for you? What kind of image does this conjure up for you? The first meaning that presents itself is that of energy and dynamism, like a charge of electricity. Does this idea attract me? Speak to God now, about what arises from your time of reflection and the emotions this poem has evoked in you. As you express these feelings to God, can you also ask him to deepen your sense of wonder and delight at his presence.

This is the eighth Pray as you go reflection, commemorating the two hundredth anniversary of the Restoration of the Society of Jesus. A reflection on the life of St Alberto Hurtado. Joanne Boyce sings You are my Hands. This month we are reflecting on the life of St Alberto Hurtado.

He was dedicated to making Catholic Social Teaching more widely known and understood. He was much sought-after as an inspirational preacher and retreat director for young people. He died of cancer aged 51 and was widely revered throughout Chile for his saintliness. I hold that every poor man, every vagrant, every beggar is Christ carrying his cross. And as Christ, we must love and help him.

We must treat him as a brother, a human being like ourselves. If we were to start a campaign of love for the poor and homeless, we would, in a short time, do away with depressing scenes of begging, children sleeping in doorways and women with babies in their arms fainting in our streets.

There are many sufferings to heal. Christ stumbles through our streets in the person of so many poor who are hungry, thrown out of their miserable lodgings because of sickness and destitution. Christ has no home! And we who have the good fortune to have one and have food to satisfy our hunger, what are we doing about it?

St Alberto has in mind real faces he has actually seen with his own eyes around the city he lives in, the faces of the poor, the hungry and the destitute. For sure, the faces you know will be different ones.

See if you can bring to mind the times and places when you have encountered the homeless where you live. Can you picture their faces? And now, notice how you reacted to the people you saw.

Did you turn away from them or move towards them? Did you feel disgust, or fear, or tenderness, sympathy…? How would you like to react the next time?

Put aside your hesitations and inhibitions… if St Alberto is right, if people in need are nothing less than Christ in our midst, how do you want to respond to Him, standing in front of you, needing your help? Finding Christ in the poor is not as easy as it sounds. We need the help of deep prayer and we can count on the support of our friends in the communion of saints.

Finally, ask the Lord to help you to go deeper. He is always happy to receive the doubts and dreams of his followers. When we talk freely and openly to him about our lives, He offers us His healing, his insight and his power. Take a moment to open your heart to Him now; sharing with Him anything you need to say and asking Him to help you respond lovingly and generously to the needs of the poor. This is the ninth reflection, commemorating the two hundredth anniversary of the Restoration of the Society of Jesus.

A reflection on the life of Henri de Lubac. You are the centre, Lord, of my life. The centre of my life. Amid all my preoccupations, all the worries and hassles and concerns in my mind right now, can I focus for a moment on the centre of my life? Can I open my heart to God, my guide, my healer, my teacher? Henri de Lubac was born in and was arguably one of the greatest theologians of the 20th century. Like his friend and fellow-French Jesuit, Teilhard de Chardin, it was his study of the past that made him a revolutionary scholar.

De Lubac enriched the study of God for the entire Christian community. He died in God is not a spectacle. Hence it is not enough, as St Augustine said, to have been initiated once unless one is unceasingly inebriated at the fountain of eternal Light. The characteristic of God, who, in revealing himself, shows himself to be incomprehensible, is not conditioned simply by the obscurity of earthly faith.

This faith therefore cannot simply disappear in the face-to-face vision; on the contrary, it is then, precisely, that the incomprehensibility of God in every perception of God will reach its maximum.

It would be ridiculous and contrary to all experience as well as to all true faith to interpret this face-to-face vision as a definitive grasping, after the fashion of an acquired science or a human philosophy. Henri de Lubac describes an encounter with a person not an idea. Reflect over your own experiences of encountering God. Is there anything in what De Lubac describes that you recognise?

If so, dwell there for a few moments. Is there anything in what De Lubac describes that you long for? Longing and searching can also be another way of encounter. If so, dwell in your longing and your searching, can you get a sense of it not as an absence but as, in itself, a presence that is holding you and calling you?

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