ATEX 137 RICHTLIJN PDF

We use necessary cookies to make our website work. We also use cookies to collect information about how you use HSE. Beta This is a new way of showing guidance - your feedback will help us improve it. Explosive atmospheres in the workplace can be caused by flammable gases, mists or vapours or by combustible dusts.

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We use necessary cookies to make our website work. We also use cookies to collect information about how you use HSE. Beta This is a new way of showing guidance - your feedback will help us improve it. Explosive atmospheres in the workplace can be caused by flammable gases, mists or vapours or by combustible dusts. Explosions can cause loss of life and serious injuries as well as significant damage. Explosive atmospheres can be caused by flammable gases, mists or vapours or by combustible dusts.

If there is enough of the substance, mixed with air, then all it needs is a source of ignition to cause an explosion. Preventing releases of dangerous substances, which can create explosive atmospheres, and preventing sources of ignition are two widely used ways of reducing the risk. Using the correct equipment can help greatly in this. A summary of those requirements can be found below. This page does not deal with intentional explosives such as those used in demolition work or blasting in quarries.

In DSEAR, an explosive atmosphere is defined as a mixture of dangerous substances with air, under atmospheric conditions, in the form of gases, vapours, mist or dust in which, after ignition has occurred, combustion spreads to the entire unburned mixture.

Atmospheric conditions are commonly referred to as ambient temperatures and pressures. Many workplaces may contain, or have activities that produce, explosive or potentially explosive atmospheres. Examples include places where work activities create or release flammable gases or vapours, such as vehicle paint spraying, or in workplaces handling fine organic dusts such as grain flour or wood.

ATEX is the name commonly given to the two European Directives for controlling explosive atmospheres:. For more information on how the requirements of the Directive have been put into effect in Great Britain see the information in the section Explosive atmospheres in the workplace below.

For more information on how the requirements of the Directive have been put into effect in Great Britain see the section on Equipment and protective systems intended for use in explosive atmospheres. The requirements in DSEAR apply to most workplaces where a potentially explosive atmosphere may occur. Some industry sectors and work activities are exempted because there is other legislation that fulfils the requirements.

In addition to the general requirements, the Regulations place the following specific duties on employers with workplaces where explosive atmospheres may occur. Employers must classify areas where hazardous explosive atmospheres may occur into zones. The classification given to a particular zone, and its size and location, depends on the likelihood of an explosive atmosphere occurring and its persistence if it does.

Schedule 2 of DSEAR contains descriptions of the various classifications of zones for gases and vapours and for dusts. Further information and guidance on the classification and zoning of areas where potentially explosive atmospheres may occur and the selection of equipment for use in those areas:.

Areas classified into zones must be protected from sources of ignition. Equipment and protective systems intended to be used in zoned areas should be selected to meet the requirements of the Equipment and Protective Systems Intended for Use in Potentially Explosive Atmospheres Regulations Equipment already in use before July can continue to be used indefinitely provided a risk assessment shows it is safe to do so.

Where necessary, the entry points to areas classified into zones must be marked with a specified 'EX' sign. Employers must provide workers who work in zoned areas with appropriate clothing that does not create the risk of an electrostatic discharge igniting the explosive atmosphere, eg anti-static footwear.

The clothing provided depends on the level of risk identified in the risk assessment. Before a workplace containing zoned areas comes into operation for the first time, the employer must ensure that the overall explosion safety measures are confirmed verified as being safe. This must be done by a person or organisation competent to consider the particular risks in the workplace, and the adequacy of the explosion control and other measures put in place. The Regulations apply to all equipment intended for use in explosive atmospheres, whether electrical or mechanical, and also to protective systems.

Once certified, the equipment is marked by the 'EX' symbol to identify it as such. Certification ensures that the equipment or protective system is fit for its intended purpose and that adequate information is supplied with it to ensure that it can be used safely.

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The ATEX directives consists of two EU directives describing the minimum safety requirements of the workplace and equipment used in explosive atmosphere. Organisations in the EU must follow Directives to protect employees from explosion risk in areas with an explosive atmosphere. It refers to the harmonisation of the laws of the Member States relating to equipment and protective systems intended for use in potentially explosive atmospheres. The classification given to a particular zone, and its size and location, depends on the likelihood of an explosive atmosphere occurring and its persistence if it does. Equipment in use before July is allowed to be used indefinitely provided a risk assessment shows it is safe to do so.

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You can find the official document on the european commission website and on the following page :. The Guidelines should be used in conjunction with the Directive itself and with the European Commission's document " The 'Blue Guide' on the implementation of EU product rules " [4]. First and foremost, this document must ensure that, when correctly applied, the Directive leads to the removal of obstacles and difficulties related to the free circulation free movement of goods within the European Union EU and the European Economic Area EEA. All parties concerned should be aware of other requirements, which may also apply. It lays down essential health and safety requirements and leaves it to standards, primarily European harmonised standards, to give technical expression of the relevant requirements contained in the Directive. The reader will want to be aware that where ATEX products are intended for use in a place of work, national and EU legislation, intended to ensure the safety of employees, will usually apply.

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You can find the official document on the european commission website and on the following page :. The summary and links to its contents are presented hereafter. First and foremost, this document must ensure that, when correctly applied, the Directive leads to the removal of obstacles and difficulties related to the free circulation free movement of goods within the European Union EU and the European Economic Area EEA. All parties concerned should be aware of other requirements, which may also apply. It lays down essential health and safety requirements and leaves it to standards, primarily European harmonised standards, to give technical expression of the relevant requirements contained in the Directive.

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