BOELLSTORFF COMING OF AGE PDF

In the book, Boellstorff, or Tom Bukowski his SL avatar , dedicates the first section to outlining the history of virtual worlds before turning to the methodological approach he undertook to conduct his fieldwork. In section two, the author examines the culture of second life under the chapter headings of a place and time b personhood c intimacy and d community. Within the first sub-section, Boellstorff underlines the importance of the visual aspects of Second Life and how a sense of place, increased through landscape and home-ownership, is fundamental to residents. He also comes to understand how sociality is a key reason why the majority of residents remain in Second Life and that this is largely due to the possibility for synchronous interaction with other residents.

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In the book, Boellstorff, or Tom Bukowski his SL avatar , dedicates the first section to outlining the history of virtual worlds before turning to the methodological approach he undertook to conduct his fieldwork. In section two, the author examines the culture of second life under the chapter headings of a place and time b personhood c intimacy and d community. Within the first sub-section, Boellstorff underlines the importance of the visual aspects of Second Life and how a sense of place, increased through landscape and home-ownership, is fundamental to residents.

He also comes to understand how sociality is a key reason why the majority of residents remain in Second Life and that this is largely due to the possibility for synchronous interaction with other residents.

The effects of lag and afk on social interaction are discussed. The section also looks at embodiment and how this is used by physically disabled in the actual world as well as race and gender. Within the section on intimacy, the author investigates language within SL. He discusses the use of acronyms, different turn-taking practices and how residents code-switch between group instant messaging within a specific location and one-one- instant messaging between avatars NB.

At the time of writing audio chat was not incorporated into SL. Boellstorff then turns to describing how friendship is the primary relationship form with SL and that SL friendships, are often considered as more real than actual world friendships, due to the lack of prejudges based on gender, race, age etc and the idea that SL friendships are accelerated friendships due to their intensity.

The different sexual communities which exist in SL are then examined as are romantic relationships. The main idea within this section is to reiterate that virtual worlds are places, which become sites of culture as residents interact and that with time they become communities.

The author also looks at communities which extend over several virtual worlds and the importance of forums and blogs which constitute part of the SL community. Perhaps the strongest messages within this final chapter are, firstly, that SL, despite drawing on aspects of the actual world, is not a simulation, as the world does not seek to become a replicate of the actual world, and secondly, that SL is not a social network.

Rather, the author describes the virtual world of Second Life as a place of sociality where culture can be crafted. Aller au contenu.

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Reading an ethnography: Coming of Age in Second Life

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Coming of Age in Second Life: An Anthropologist Explores the Virtually Human

Boellstorf provides an ethnographic portrait of the culture of Second Life, which is an online, graphical virtual world developed by a company called Linden Lab in Ethnographic texts are primarily aimed at anthropological audiences rather than a general readership. He wants the book to be read and debated by several different groups of people, not only anthropologists but scholars, students, and designers in fields such as game studies, informatics, and science and technology studies as well as people who participate in virtual worlds or online games p. However, by writing for such a diverse audience, Boellstorff has to make visible ethnographic techniques that would ordinarily be implicit and understood by anthropologists. For example:. Boellstorff states that virtual worlds are fundamentally places p. By legitimating Second Life as a research field, it enables Boellstorff to argue for the potential of ethnography for studying virtual worlds p.

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